React hook library

Best React hook library for front end developer 2021

 

React’s hook API is a must for creating components. It coexists alongside the class component API, which lets us create components with JavaScript classes. As well as standard Hooks that come with the React library, developers can create their own Hooks. Unsurprisingly, many custom Hooks libraries have since popped up to make creating React apps even easier. In this article, we will know about Best React hook library 2021.

What are react hooks?

Hooks are the new feature introduced in the React 16.8 version. It allows you to use state and other React features without writing a class.

Hooks are the functions which “hook into” React state and lifecycle features from function components. It does not work inside classes.

It is used when you write a function component, and then you want to add some state to it, previously you do this by converting it to a class. But now you can do it by using a Hook inside the existing function component.

 

In this article we will discuss the best React hook library:

 

React Hooks Library

React Hooks Lib provides us with Hooks that resemble the lifecycle methods of React class components.

For example, it offers Hooks like useDidMount, which runs when the component is mounted, and useDidUpdate, which runs when the component updates. It also has Hooks for managing states, like useCounter, which add a number state with its own functions to manage it.

 

To install package run the below command:

npm i react-hooks-lib --save

 

we will import module using useDidMount, run the below code:

import React from "react";
import { useDidMount } from "react-hooks-lib";

export default function App() {
  useDidMount(() => {
    console.log("did mount");
  });

  return (
    <div className="App">
      <h1>Hello world</h1>
    </div>
  );
}

 

Same method we can use “useCounter” hook:

import React from "react";
import { useCounter } from "react-hooks-lib";

export default function App() {
  const { count, inc, dec, reset } = useCounter(0);
  return (
    <div>
      {count}
      <button onClick={() => inc(1)}>increment</button>
      <button onClick={() => dec(1)}>decrement</button>
      <button onClick={reset}>reset</button>
    </div>
  );
}

 

It returns an object with the count state and the inc, dec, and reset methods. Let’s break down what these methods do:

  1. inc increments count by a given number
  2. dec decrements count by a given number
  3. reset resets the count to the initial value

React Hooks Lib also comes with the useField Hook to make getting and setting input values easier. We can use it by writing:

import React from "react";
import { useField } from "react-hooks-lib";

export default function App() {
  const { value, bind } = useField("text");

  return (
    <div>
      <input type="text" {...bind} />
      <p>{value}</p>
    </div>
  );
}

 

We just pass the “bind” object into the input, and we can use it to get the data from the input and set it as the value of value. bind also has the value property to set the input value. It also work with select elements:

import React from "react";
import { useField } from "react-hooks-lib";

export default function App() {
  const { value, bind } = useField("text");

  return (
    <div>
      <select {...bind}>
        <option value="apple">apple</option>
        <option value="orange">orange</option>
      </select>
      <p>{value}</p>
    </div>
  );
}

 

Note: React Hooks Lib comes with many other Hooks that provide similar functionality. Overall, it provides us with custom Hooks that can do a few convenient things

 

react-hanger

react-hanger is a library that provides us with react hook for easily manage various kind of states; which includes following Hooks:

  • useInput – get and set input control values
  • useBoolean – get and set Boolean states
  • useNumber – get and set number states
  • useArray – get and set array states
  • useOnMount – run code when a component mounts
  • useOnUnmount – run code when a component unmounts
  • useStateful – get and set component state

 

We can use useInput to as follows to make processing input values simpler:

import React from "react";
import { useInput } from "react-hanger";

export default function App() {
  const input = useInput("");

  return (
    <div>
      <input type="text" value={input.value} onChange={input.onChange} />
      <p>{input.value}</p>
    </div>
  );
}

 

Use the useNumber to get and set a number state:

import React from "react";
import { useNumber } from "react-hanger";

export default function App() {
  const counter = useNumber(3, { lowerLimit: 0, upperLimit: 5 });

  return (
    <div>
      <p> {counter.value} </p>
      <button onClick={() => counter.increase()}> increase </button>
      <button onClick={() => counter.decrease()}> decrease </button>
    </div>
  );
}

 

We can set counter.value‘s initial value with the first argument, and we can set the lower and upper limit of the counter.value state with the second. The useArray and useBoolean Hooks work in a similar way.

To set any kind of state, we can use the useStateful Hook:

import React from "react";
import { useStateful } from "react-hanger";

export default function App() {
  const username = useStateful("tom");

  return (
    <div>
      <p> {username.value} </p>
      <button onClick={() => username.setValue("tom")}> tom </button>
      <button onClick={() => username.setValue("jerry")}> jerry </button>
    </div>
  );
}

 

we can get the value of the state from the value property, and we can set the value with the setValue method of the returned object.

 

React hookedUp

React hookedUp helps you to manage component states. we can also use it to manage focus and hovering of HTML elements.

It comes with Hooks that replicate the functionality of class component lifecycle Hooks.

Let’s take a look at the useHover Hook, which will detect if we hover over an input:

import React from "react";
import { useHover } from "react-hookedup";

export default function App() {
  const { hovered, bind } = useHover();

  return (
    <div>
      <p>{hovered ? "hovered" : "not hovered"}</p>
      <input {...bind} />
    </div>
  );
}

We just spread the whole bind object as props for the input. The useFocus Hook can be used in a similar way.

If we miss our good ol’ componentDidMount method in class components, we can use the useOnMount Hook to provide equivalent functionality in function components:

import React from "react";
import { useOnMount } from "react-hookedup";

export default function App() {
  useOnMount(() => console.log("mounted"));
  return <div> hello world </div>;
}

If we want to call setInterval in our code, we can use the useInterval Hook. For example, we can write:

 

import React, { useState } from "react";
import { useInterval } from "react-hookedup";

export default function App() {
  const [time, setTime] = useState(new Date().toString());

  useInterval(() => setTime(new Date().toString()), 1000);

  return <p>{time}</p>;
}

We just pass in the callback to run as the first argument and the interval as the second argument, like the setInterval function.

It also comes with the useTimeout Hook to run a callback after a given delay:

import React from "react";
import { useTimeout } from "react-hookedup";

export default function App() {
  useTimeout(() => alert("hello world"), 1500);

  return <h1>hello world</h1>;
}

 

Another useful Hook from React hookedUp is useOnlineStatus, which allows us to watch the online status of our app.

import React from "react";
import { useOnlineStatus } from "react-hookedup";

export default function App() {
  const { online } = useOnlineStatus();

  return <h1>{online ? "online" : "offline"}</h1>;
}

It returns true if devices is online.

 

React-use

react-use Hooks library comes with a larger collection of Hooks than the other libraries .  It also comes with Hooks to watch screen size, motion, scrolling, animation, and to dynamically adjust CSS, among many others.

we can use the useMouse Hook to watch the position of a user’s mouse:

import React from "react";
import { useMouse } from "react-use";

export default function App() {
  const ref = React.useRef(null);
  const { docX, docY, posX, posY, elX, elY, elW, elH } = useMouse(ref);

  return (
    <div ref={ref}>
      <div>
        Mouse position in document - ({docX}, {docY})
      </div>
      <div>
        Mouse position in element - ({elX}, {elY})
      </div>
      <div>
        Element position- ({posX} , {posY})
      </div>
      <div>
        Element dimensions - {elW}x{elH}
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}

we can use the useScroll Hook to track the scroll position of an element:

import React from "react";
import { useScroll } from "react-use";

export default function App() {
  const scrollRef = React.useRef(null);
  const { x, y } = useScroll(scrollRef);

  return (
    <div ref={scrollRef} style={{ height: 300, overflowY: "scroll" }}>
      <div style={{ position: "fixed" }}>
        <div>x: {x}</div>
        <div>y: {y}</div>
      </div>
      {Array(100)
        .fill()
        .map((_, i) => (
          <p key={i}>{i}</p>
        ))}
    </div>
  );
}

We can also use Hooks react-use provides for animation. For example, we can use the useSpring Hook to animate number displays:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import useSpring from "react-use/lib/useSpring";

export default function App() {
  const [target, setTarget] = useState(50);
  const value = useSpring(target);

  return (
    <div>
      {value}
      <br />
      <button onClick={() => setTarget(0)}>Set 0</button>
      <button onClick={() => setTarget(200)}>Set 100</button>
    </div>
  );
}

We pass the number to animate to into the useSpring Hook. Then the number will animate until the target is reache

The library also has Hooks to let us commit various side effects, like copying data to the clipboard and manipulating local storage. To add a copy-to-clipboard feature, we can use the useCopyToClipboard Hook:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import useCopyToClipboard from "react-use/lib/useCopyToClipboard";

export default function App() {
  const [text, setText] = useState("");
  const [state, copyToClipboard] = useCopyToClipboard();

  return (
    <div>
      <input value={text} onChange={(e) => setText(e.target.value)} />
      <button type="button" onClick={() => copyToClipboard(text)}>
        copy text
      </button>
      {state.error ? (
        <p>error: {state.error.message}</p>
      ) : (
        state.value && <p>Copied {state.value}</p>
      )}
    </div>
  );
}

We just call useCopyToClipboard in our component to get the copyToClipboard function, then we can call that to copy whatever is passed in as the argument to the clipboard.

Likewise, we can easily work with local storage via the useLocalStorage Hook:

import React from "react";
import useLocalStorage from "react-use/lib/useLocalStorage";

export default function App() {
  const [value, setValue, remove] = useLocalStorage("key", "foo");

  return (
    <div>
      <div>Value: {value}</div>
      <button onClick={() => setValue("bar")}>bar</button>
      <button onClick={() => setValue("baz")}>baz</button>
      <button onClick={() => remove()}>Remove</button>
    </div>
  );
}

 

React Recipes

React Recipes is another Hooks library that comes with many custom Hooks. It offers many of the same Hooks as react-use, such as Hooks that use browser APIs, manage states, run async code, etc.

For example, we can use the useSpeechSynthesis Hook to make the browser speak:

import React, { useState } from "react";
import { useSpeechSynthesis } from "react-recipes";

export default function App() {
  const [value, setValue] = useState("");
  const [ended, setEnded] = useState(false);
  const onBoundary = (event) => {
    console.log(`${event.name}: ${event.elapsedTime} milliseconds.`);
  };
  const onEnd = () => setEnded(true);
  const onError = (event) => {
    console.warn(event);
  };

  const {
    cancel,
    speak,
    speaking,
    supported,
    voices,
    pause,
    resume
  } = useSpeechSynthesis({
    onEnd,
    onBoundary,
    onError
  });

  if (!supported) {
    return "Speech is not supported.";
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <input value={value} onChange={(event) => setValue(event.target.value)} />
      <button
        type="button"
        onClick={() => speak({ text: value, voice: voices[1] })}
      >
        Speak
      </button>
      <button type="button" onClick={cancel}>
        Cancel
      </button>
      <button type="button" onClick={pause}>
        Pause
      </button>
      <button type="button" onClick={resume}>
        Resume
      </button>
      <p>{speaking && "Voice is speaking"}</p>
      <p>{ended && "Voice has ended"}</p>
      <div>
        <h2>Voices:</h2>
        <div>
          {voices.map((voice) => (
            <p key={voice.name}>{voice.name}</p>
          ))}
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
  );
}

We call the useSpeechSynthesis Hook, which returns an object with various properties:

  • cancel cancels the speech synthesis
  • speak makes the browser start speaking
  • speaking is a Boolean that tells us whether speech synthesis is in process
  • supported is a Boolean that informs us whether speech synthesis is supported in the current browser
  • voices has the list of voices to choose from
  • pause lets us pause speaking
  • resume lets us resume speaking

 

conclusion

All the hook library above mention provide some basic Hooks for state management that can help us simplify state management to a certain extent.

 

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